What Is A Rule 4 Deduction In Uk Horse Racing?

Those who have wagered on UK horse racing know that the betting process can be a little different than it is in the US. This is particularly true if you wager on the track through a bookmaker. One of the things that you will encounter when betting horses in the UK is a Rule 4 deduction. Here is a little information that you need to know about this particular circumstance.

The History of the Rule 4 Deduction in UK Horse Racing

The Rule 4 deduction can be traced back to the original Tattersalls Rules of Racing. These elaborate set of rules were created to govern horse racing in the UK, and they still apply today. The Tattersalls Rules were created in 1886 and have gone through many revisions. The most recent revision was on May 17, 2010.

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The advantage of such a set of rules which govern horse racing is that it puts racing in the UK on a level playing field throughout the jurisdiction. Compare that with the United States where there is no central governing authority for horse racing. Each jurisdiction is able to specify its own rules to some extent. Many believe that a central authority for horse racing jurisdictions presents a more fair environment for everyone concerned.

The Rule 4 deduction was so named because it was the fourth in the set of rules that were published. Today, Tattersalls is more known for its race horse auctions than it is for the rules of racing, but the influence of these rules is still felt at all UK race tracks.

How the Rule 4 Deduction Works

Basically, the Rule 4 Deduction in UK horse racing only applies when horses are withdrawn from a race before the start of the event. This can happen for a number of reasons. A horse might be lame or unable to pass a veterinary check before the race. A horse trainer might decide at the last minute to withdraw because they are not happy with how the horse has been training.

The deduction in question is taken from your winnings if you have bet on a horse to win or place. It is only taken if horses withdraw from the race right before the race begins. The theory behind this is that the bookmakers do not have an opportunity to adjust the odds on the race. Therefore, the betting market is negatively affected. You could say that Rule 4 deductions are strictly a way to minimize the losses of the bookie when the race doesn’t proceed as expected.

Let’s say that you bet on a horse in a race that has ten competitors. The bookie gives you 8-1 odds on the horse that you have chosen, figuring that it has a less than average chance of winning. Right before the race three horses are withdrawn. Your chosen horse now only has to beat six other horses instead of seven. The bookie, understandably, is compromised by this scenario. The 8-1 odds that you were given would probably be much less if the bookie had known that there were only going to be seven horses in the race instead of ten.

Rule 4 deductions in UK horse racing stipulate than an amount of money be taken from the winnings of a bettor when horses are withdrawn to balance the advantage a smaller field gives to the bettor. This is one of the downfalls of betting with bookmakers in the UK. It is much like trying to beat the casino. The odds are always going to be stacked against you by the bookies. If they did not have some kind of advantage, the bookies would never win.

The amount of the Rule 4 deduction that is made from your winning bet is determined by how much the odds were on the horse that was withdrawn. If the horse was an odds-on favorite with odds of less than 1-1, the deduction can be pretty severe. If the horse withdrawn was a longshot, the deduction might not be bad at all.

It is important to note that Rule 4 deductions in UK horse racing are only made at the live racing venues when you bet with a bookmaker. Your bookie will generally have a chart that reflects the standard amount of the deduction that you can view before you make your racing wager.

How to Avoid Rule 4 UK Racing Deductions

There is a simple way that you can avoid these Rule 4 racing deductions. Play the UK horse racing tracks at an online racebook! We have recommended several of these racebooks for you to choose from. The reason that you will not find a Rule 4 deduction at an online racebook is that there are no bookies to contend with.

When you play the horses online you are engaging in what is known as parimutuel betting. The bets that are placed go into a pool that is shared by all winners. The betting public sets the odds on each horse in a race, not the bookies. This is to your advantage, and you should play UK races online whenever you have the opportunity to do so.

A great thing about online racebooks is that they open up UK horse betting to the bettor in the US. Many racebooks that accept US players have UK tracks to choose from. Betting with the tote board is more transparent. You do not have to haggle with the bookie for good odds on a horse. All you have to do is see what the horse is valued at on the tote board and decide if you are willing to accept the price. With a few clicks you can place your bet online and just wait for the results of the race. Nothing could be easier.

In the opinion of EZ Horse Betting it is far more profitable to avoid UK Rule 4 racing deductions by betting online. Why should you be punished by the bookie if a horse withdraws from a race? You are not betting the races to make the bookie rich. You are trying to make a profit for yourself. No one says that you have to willingly assist the bookie in their profit making venture.

As the popularity of online racebooks grows throughout the world, one cannot help but wonder what will happen to the bookies eventually. They will never go away as long as there is live racing for people to enjoy, but the attendance at many racing venues has dropped as more people decide to bet the horses online.

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